XL Video supplied video equipment and crew to two high profile performances at the 2008 Greenwich & Docklands International festival in London. The event presented a free program of street and outdoor entertainment throughout the area, including Run and Time Is Like Flowing Water. Technical manager for both events for was Richard Williamson.

XL Video’s project manager Paul Wood comments, “This is the first time XL has been involved with this event. It was great to be involved with creative projects such as this, and it’s good to see artists incorporating and experimenting with video in inventive ways.”

Run
Staged at The Queen’s House next to Greenwich Maritime Museum, the show told the history of running, with the help of dancing, choreography, music, and HD video. XL Video supplied 4 Barco FLM HDR18 projectors, 2 Doremi HD video hard drives, and a ScreenPro 2 HD switcher for this 30-minute show, featuring specially commissioned HD video content produced by Gary Vernon from film producers Film38. XL Video’s projectionist was Paul Barry.

The projectors were positioned 75 meters from the front of the Queen’s House, and were overlaid to produce one very bright image measuring 35 meters wide by 12 meters high, providing a dramatic backdrop.

Time Is Like Water Flowing
At the London Piazza at the O2 Arena, Chinese landscape painting was brought to life by French vertical theatre company Les Passagers directed by Philippe Riou. They combined the excitement and anticipation of aerial performance, martial arts, and multimedia effects in this highly visual work.

Les Passagers performed on bungee ropes suspended in front of a 12-meter high by 14-meter wide canvas structure that was painted daily for the four days of the show. A fifth of the width of the canvas was clear vinyl, and behind that XL Video rigged a 12-meter high by 2.8-meter wide Stealth LED screen, showing custom animations produced by Beijing-based new media duo 8gg, running together with the performance.

Original music was created by Liz Chi Yen Liew and Tom E. Morrison, and XL Video’s technician was Rob Smith.