Recently PBS aired a special on a piece called loopdiver: The Journey of a Dance by choreographer/media artist Dawn Stoppiello and composer/media artist Mark Coniglio, also known as international "dance-theatre-media" company Troika Ranch. That's the performance half of the Troika Tronix company that develops the performance software Isadora.

In loopdiver, filmmakers follow company members as they create movements and visuals for an extremely physically and emotionally demanding performance.

From the liner notes: "What begins as an experiment involving the loops and repetitions created by today’s computerized modern world evolves into a complex exploration into the repetitive patterns in which ordinary people find themselves trapped. Over the course of two years, company members struggle with their own inner turmoil as they master the work’s complicated choreography."

The documentary is an incredible look at the creation of a piece that it is heavily integrated with media and software. Although aimed at a broad audience, there is a fair amount of discussion of methods and tricks they use within Isadora, and the concepts are easily extended to other work with media.

Troika Ranch runs all sound and video from its “Media Station,” which is generally located on one of the audience sides of the stage space so that the stage can be seen from the station. The piece requires two 4,500-lumen or better LCD video projectors, and audio comprises a 16-channel mixer with either four bus outputs or four auxiliary; four speakers and one subwoofer.

Check out the production's full tech rider here.

View the PBS show here.