Christie projectors were central to SAT’s innovative SAT(osphere), a portable projection dome 18m (59 feet) in diameter, which played a key role in the aboriginal commemoration facet of the festivities marking the 400th anniversary of the city of Quebec.

The SAT(osphere), open from June 21 to July 1, was created by artists at Montreal’s Society For Arts and Technology (SAT). Built on the banks of the Bassin Louise in the old Port of Quebec City, the inflatable dome showcased the First Nations-themed multimedia show, Domagaya, named for the son of the Iroquois leader whose village became present-day Quebec City.

“SAT was created for artists by artists,” says SAT director of research and strategy, René Barsalo, of the 7,000-member organization. “We need playgrounds to experiment with our works of art, places where people can meet and engage in the culture.” The 400th anniversary of Quebec City, the birthplace of French civilization in North America and a UNESCO World Heritage site, proved to be the ideal locale.

SAT designs and markets its mobile SAT(osphere) as an immersive AV venue for large audiences. Formed by an inflatable hemisphere which can accommodate approximately 400 spectators, the SAT(osphere) has the potential to revolutionize the way events such as concerts, conferences, seminars and trade fairs are held. Quebec City’s SAT(osphere) was located in front of The Image Mill, a sound and image spectacular created by Robert Lepage and Ex Machina measuring 657m (2/3 km) long by 33m (108 feet) high, illuminated by Christie projectors.

“In creating the SAT(osphere) for the 400th anniversary of Quebec, Christie was with us from day one,” Barsalo reports. “In doing the research, we found that Christie and SAT were so similar in our philosophies that we were meant to work together.”

The challenge in presenting Domagaya in the SAT(osphere) was blending images in real-time and using powerful, bright projectors with multi-blend capabilities. SAT selected three Christie DS+8K 3-chip DLP® projectors and real-time rendering, auto-blending software from Montreal-based VYV to create a complete 360 x 180-degree “computer screen” to display the show—a fusion of aboriginal cultures and digital arts.

Domagaya, which has a contemporary, rap, trance, and Native Beat soundtrack composed by SAT VJs, is the first content created for the immersive environment. The SAT(osphere), with its trio of Christie projectors displaying Domagaya, will soon go on tour as part of SAT’s “Techno Circus.” It will have a permanent home atop the SAT building in Montreal.