In the fall of 2001, Chicago spectators experienced a needed catharsis: When going into rehearsal in August, no one at the Steppenwolf Theatre knew how timely an epic play set during an epic holy war would be. Nor did they guess they would use a PC to run the turntable for David Hare's adaptation of Mother Courage and Her Children. Absent were attempts to distance spectators from characters and events, as Brecht once urged. A solid curtain hid the stage before the play began, pierced only ...

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